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Ohio is going short of qualified construction labors amidst plenty of construction jobs


A national trend in the construction industry has begun to be felt in central Ohio, as skilled workers needed to build offices, hospitals, warehouses and hotels are becoming increasingly difficult to find.

 

Some newspapers and Construction journals have repeatedly bring this news recently.

 

“We saw it happening during the construction of the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center,” said Kyle Rooney, vice president and general manager of Turner Construction’s local office.

 

“We had to bring in people from other counties and even other states to supplement what was available here,” he said of the $1.1 billion project that utilized 700 to 800 workers on a daily basis and is set to open in December.

 

The growing worker shortage is a concern in the industry as it recovers from the recession, according to a new study from the Associated General Contractors of America. It found that 83 percent of the more than 1,000 construction companies surveyed are having problems filling craft-worker positions such as carpenters, equipment operators and laborers.

 

Ohio Construction News

 

Most construction firms report they are having trouble finding qualified craft workers to fill key spots as the industry recovers from its years-long downturn, according to the results of an industry-wide survey released today by AGC of America. Association officials called for new career and technical school programs, as well as other workforce measures to offset the labor shortages.

 

“As the survey results make clear, many construction firms across the country are having a hard time filling available positions,” said Ken Simonson, chief economist for the Associated General Contractors. “Considering how much the nation’s educational focus has moved away from teaching students career and technical skills during the past few decades, it is easy to understand why the construction industry is facing such severe labor shortages.”

 

In a recent press release it has said that 83 per cent of construction firms report having trouble finding qualified workers to meet growing demand for construction service.

 

Most construction firms report they are having trouble finding qualified craft workers to fill key spots as the industry recovers from its years-long downturn, according to the results of an industry-wide survey released today by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials called for new career and technical school programs, as well as other workforce measures to offset the labor shortages.

 

"As the survey results make clear, many construction firms across the country are having a hard time filling available positions," said Ken Simonson, chief economist for the Associated General Contractors.

 

"Considering how much the nation's educational focus has moved away from teaching students career and technical skills during the past few decades, it is easy to understand why the construction industry is facing such severe labor shortages."

 

Eighty-three percent of responding firms nationwide are having a hard time filling craft worker positions? On site construction jobs including carpenters, equipment operators and laborers. Sixty-one percent are having a hard time filling professional positions? Including project supervisors, estimators and engineers.

 

Simonson noted that worker shortages appear most severe in the Southeast, where 86 percent of contractors report having a hard time finding qualified workers. Eighty-four percent of contractors in the Midwest, 82 percent in the West and 67 percent in the Northeast report difficulty finding workers.

 

Here in Ohio, construction companies also struggle to find project managers and engineers, as well as equipment operators, carpenters, laborers, drywall installers and welders, according to the report.

 

“We have an aging workforce that is retiring, and we don’t have enough young people coming in to fill the pipeline,” said Barton Hacker, president of the Associated Builders and Contractors chapter of central Ohio.

 

The problem is even more severe in the less-populated eastern part of the state, where the quest to find oil and gas has created the need for construction workers.

 

“They don’t have a ready-made workforce in these areas and are definitely having problems finding workers,” Hacker said.

 

The worker shortage has changed the ways companies operate. About 50 percent are using more subcontractors and 37 percent are using staffing companies, according to the Associated General Contractors survey.

 

It could get worse in the coming months, as 39 percent of the state’s contractors believe it will become even more difficult to find construction workers.

 

“The younger people coming out of school are looking at other career opportunities,” Rooney said. Hacker and the local Associated General Contractors group are trying to change this.

 

The organization’s Ohio Construction Academy charter school is in its second year and has about 40 students.

 

This is the report, which says how Ohio is short of labor : 2014_Workforce_Ohio.pdf

 

Ref : www.cleveland.com, news.agc.org, www.dispatch.com

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